Protein Rich Microgreens

A concise guide to cultivating protein rich plants, suitable for both urban and rural settings, to ensure sustained nutrition in the face of potential disruptions.

At a Glance

  1. Beans: Legumes are renowned for their protein content and adaptability to diverse growing conditions. While beans are not as commonly grown as microgreens compared to other plants like kale or radishes, some bean varieties, such as mung beans and adzuki beans, are suitable for microgreen production.
  2. Broccoli: This cruciferous vegetable not only provides essential nutrients but also serves as a valuable protein source.
  3. Corn: A staple crop worldwide, corn offers both sustenance and protein, particularly when harvested at the right stage.
  4. Edamame (soy): Soybeans are a complete protein source and can be cultivated in various climates, making them a versatile addition to any survival garden.
  5. Kale: Known for its resilience and nutritional density, kale is an excellent choice for protein rich greens.
  6. Parsley: Often overlooked, parsley is not only a flavorful herb but also contains notable amounts of protein.
  7. Peas: Whether consumed fresh or dried, peas are a valuable protein source and can be easily grown in small spaces.
  8. Quinoa: Considered a superfood for its nutritional profile, quinoa is a complete protein source and thrives in diverse environments.
  9. Spinach: Rich in vitamins and minerals, spinach is also surprisingly high in protein, making it a valuable addition to any diet.
  10. Sunflower: Beyond its seeds’ nutritional value, sunflower foliage offers protein rich greens for consumption.

Cultivating these protein rich plants can be achieved in various settings, from urban balconies to rural homesteads. Container gardening allows for flexibility and space optimization, while traditional ground cultivation ensures optimal growth and yield for larger crops like corn and sunflower.

During colder months or in regions with limited sunlight, indoor cultivation becomes essential. Utilizing artificial lighting and proper temperature control can sustain plant growth year-round, ensuring a steady protein supply regardless of external conditions.

Additionally, incorporating sprouts and microgreens into your diet provides a quick and efficient means of boosting protein intake. Simple steps, such as rinsing and soaking seeds, facilitate sprout growth within days, while microgreens offer crunchy, nutrient-rich greens in a matter of weeks.

Growing & Harvesting Details

  1. Beans:
    • Height: Varies (1 to 10 feet)
    • Microgreen Harvest: Beans are not typically grown as microgreens.
    • Maturity: 50-70 days
    • Water Requirements: Regular watering is necessary for bean plants to thrive.
    • Light Needs: Beans require full sun for optimal growth.
  2. Broccoli:
    • Height: 18-30 inches
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 1-2 inches in height, typically within 1-2 weeks after sowing.
    • Maturity: 60-100 days
    • Water Requirements: Consistent moisture is essential for broccoli’s growth as both microgreens and mature plants.
    • Light Needs: Full sun is preferred for broccoli, though it can tolerate partial shade.
  3. Corn:
    • Height: 6-10 feet
    • Microgreen Harvest: Corn is not typically grown as microgreens.
    • Maturity: 60-100 days
    • Water Requirements: Consistent moisture is crucial for corn’s growth.
    • Light Needs: Corn requires full sun for optimal growth.
  4. Edamame (Soy):
    • Height: Varies (2 to 5 feet)
    • Microgreen Harvest: Edamame is not typically grown as microgreens.
    • Maturity: 80-120 days
    • Water Requirements: Consistent moisture is crucial for soybean plants.
    • Light Needs: Full sun is necessary for soybean growth.
  5. Kale:
    • Height: 1 to 3 feet
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 1-2 inches in height, typically within 1-2 weeks after sowing.
    • Maturity: 50-70 days
    • Water Requirements: Consistently moist soil is crucial for kale’s development, whether as microgreens or mature plants.
    • Light Needs: Kale prefers full sun but can tolerate partial shade.
  6. Parsley:
    • Height: 6-12 inches
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 1-2 inches in height, typically within 2-3 weeks after sowing.
    • Maturity: 70-90 days
    • Water Requirements: Evenly moist soil is essential for parsley’s growth, whether as microgreens or mature plants.
    • Light Needs: Parsley can thrive in partial shade to full sun conditions.
  7. Peas:
    • Height: Varies (1 to 6 feet)
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 2-3 inches in height, typically within 2-3 weeks after sowing.
    • Maturity: 60-90 days
    • Water Requirements: Peas require regular watering to support their growth, whether as microgreens or mature plants.
    • Light Needs: Full sun is necessary for optimal pea growth.
  8. Quinoa:
    • Height: 3-6 feet
    • Microgreen Harvest: Quinoa is not typically grown as microgreens.
    • Maturity: 90-120 days
    • Water Requirements: Moderate moisture levels are required for quinoa plants.
    • Light Needs: Quinoa requires full sun for optimal growth.
  9. Spinach:
    • Height: 6-12 inches
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 1-2 inches in height, typically within 1-2 weeks after sowing. Maturity: 30-50 days
    • Water Requirements: Spinach prefers consistently moist soil to support its rapid growth as both microgreens and mature plants.
    • Light Needs: Full sun is preferred for spinach, but it can tolerate partial shade.
  10. Sunflower:
    • Height: Varies (2 to 12 feet)
    • Microgreen Harvest: Microgreens can be harvested when they reach 1-2 inches in height, typically within 1-2 weeks after sowing.
    • Maturity: 70-100 days
    • Water Requirements: Regular watering is necessary for sunflowers to thrive.
    • Light Needs: Sunflowers require full sun for optimal growth.